jessfink:

Some dirty little burlesque doodles.

rosalarian:

Darlin’ It’s Betta Down Where It’s Wetta is now in print!!

The story of Pearl the mermaid, who has only heard of vaginas in legends, and thinks they sound amazing. After encountering a naked girl on the beach, she becomes determined to get one herself.

It’s both silly and sexy, the best combination as far as I’m concerned. There are lots of different body shapes on all the characters, and everyone in it is very happy to be having all this sex.

It’s $25 for the “original style” which is in sepia with rosy accents, but you can also get it in greyscale for $20. There are 148 pages in the comic which ran on Filthy Figments. It is the most beautiful book I have put together so far.

bluedelliquanti:

IT’S LIVE. The Smut Peddler Kickstarter is live!

I’m in this book, guys.  It’s a very funny, very special, very sexy book full of quality comics.  PREORDER THAT SHIT.

kateordie:

This NSFW little comic is an example of my chief creative rule: if I think of it, I have to make it.

kateordie:

This NSFW little comic is an example of my chief creative rule: if I think of it, I have to make it.

My pet project, the Women in Comics Wiki (hosted at Wikia), contains articles on all-female publications—and that includes erotic comics!  Most of the cover images are merely suggestive, but the above cover to Tits & Clits #6 caught the attention of Wikia’s “ImageReview” and was deleted last night as being in violation of their Terms of Use.  I have written the following message in its defense:

Hello,
I am writing in regards to an image file that has been repeatedly deleted by WikiImageReviews for alleged Terms of Use violations….[I explain that I uploaded the image with this message].
I can only assume this image was deemed to be obscene and/or pornographic, classifications I dispute wholeheartedly.
Obscenity was defined by the Supreme Court of the United States in Miller v. California by the following three-part test:
“(a) whether ‘the average person, applying contemporary community standards would find that the work, taken as a whole, appeals to the prurient interest, (b) whether the work depicts or describes, in a patently offensive way, sexual conduct specifically defined by the applicable state law; and © whether the work, taken as a whole, lacks serious literary, artistic, political, or scientific value.”
a) I would argue that the work, taken as a whole, does not appeal to “prurient interests”. While the image does depict two nude people post-coitus, the speech balloon where the woman asks the man “what did you use for birth control?” adds depth and layers to the image, appealing to common fears and anxieties among adults (but especially women) regarding the tenuous balance between sexual pleasure/fulfillment and the risk of pregnancy. Furthermore, the way the people are depicted in the image is more comical than sexual; their expressions are goofily exaggerated, with their limbs splayed haphazardly. For these reasons, I maintain that it does not appeal to prurient interests, with no intent to induce sexual arousal, and as such does not qualify as pornography.
b) While the Miller test mentions applicable state law, in the interest of being as broad as possible, I will merely argue against the image being “patently offensive”. Though both figures are nude, the only sexual characteristics on display are the woman’s breasts, which is commonly accepted by society as a whole in works of art and illustration. No genitals are on display, and there is no actual sexual “conduct” being depicted—the figures are clearly POST-coital. All that is explicitly depicted are two nude people sitting/reclining together on a bed, which cannot possibly be considered “patently offensive” as similar scenes are commonly shown, unchallenged, in mainstream movies and television programs. In fact, “mere nudity” was held to be protected expression in Jenkins v. Georgia.
c) The work as a whole has serious literary, artistic, and political value. On the most basic level, it is indisputably a work of art— a cartoon by acclaimed graphic novelist Joyce Farmer. Furthermore, it is the cover of a feminist erotica comic book which ran in the late “Women’s Lib” era. Its entire existence is based on making a political statement, from the crude language of the title, to the depiction of a woman enjoying sex, to the imperfections and foibles evident during and after sexual congress (such as the man’s exceedingly hairy body and goofy post-coital expression, the sudden realization of the lack of contraception) is making a political statement about the new sexual paradigm and women’s expectations in the post-Sexual Revolution, late-Women’s Liberation, post-Pill era. Furthermore, it is also a snapshot of the pre-AIDS era, imbuing the image with historical value as well. Any version of the article (present or future) about this comic book will be incomplete without this cover image.
Thank you for your consideration,
Alexa

Send me good vibes!  And maybe send Wikia your own notes of support (via the site or by direct e-mail)?

My pet project, the Women in Comics Wiki (hosted at Wikia), contains articles on all-female publications—and that includes erotic comics!  Most of the cover images are merely suggestive, but the above cover to Tits & Clits #6 caught the attention of Wikia’s “ImageReview” and was deleted last night as being in violation of their Terms of Use.  I have written the following message in its defense:

Hello,

I am writing in regards to an image file that has been repeatedly deleted by WikiImageReviews for alleged Terms of Use violations….[I explain that I uploaded the image with this message].

I can only assume this image was deemed to be obscene and/or pornographic, classifications I dispute wholeheartedly.

Obscenity was defined by the Supreme Court of the United States in Miller v. California by the following three-part test:

“(a) whether ‘the average person, applying contemporary community standards would find that the work, taken as a whole, appeals to the prurient interest, (b) whether the work depicts or describes, in a patently offensive way, sexual conduct specifically defined by the applicable state law; and © whether the work, taken as a whole, lacks serious literary, artistic, political, or scientific value.”

a) I would argue that the work, taken as a whole, does not appeal to “prurient interests”. While the image does depict two nude people post-coitus, the speech balloon where the woman asks the man “what did you use for birth control?” adds depth and layers to the image, appealing to common fears and anxieties among adults (but especially women) regarding the tenuous balance between sexual pleasure/fulfillment and the risk of pregnancy. Furthermore, the way the people are depicted in the image is more comical than sexual; their expressions are goofily exaggerated, with their limbs splayed haphazardly. For these reasons, I maintain that it does not appeal to prurient interests, with no intent to induce sexual arousal, and as such does not qualify as pornography.

b) While the Miller test mentions applicable state law, in the interest of being as broad as possible, I will merely argue against the image being “patently offensive”. Though both figures are nude, the only sexual characteristics on display are the woman’s breasts, which is commonly accepted by society as a whole in works of art and illustration. No genitals are on display, and there is no actual sexual “conduct” being depicted—the figures are clearly POST-coital. All that is explicitly depicted are two nude people sitting/reclining together on a bed, which cannot possibly be considered “patently offensive” as similar scenes are commonly shown, unchallenged, in mainstream movies and television programs. In fact, “mere nudity” was held to be protected expression in Jenkins v. Georgia.

c) The work as a whole has serious literary, artistic, and political value. On the most basic level, it is indisputably a work of art— a cartoon by acclaimed graphic novelist Joyce Farmer. Furthermore, it is the cover of a feminist erotica comic book which ran in the late “Women’s Lib” era. Its entire existence is based on making a political statement, from the crude language of the title, to the depiction of a woman enjoying sex, to the imperfections and foibles evident during and after sexual congress (such as the man’s exceedingly hairy body and goofy post-coital expression, the sudden realization of the lack of contraception) is making a political statement about the new sexual paradigm and women’s expectations in the post-Sexual Revolution, late-Women’s Liberation, post-Pill era. Furthermore, it is also a snapshot of the pre-AIDS era, imbuing the image with historical value as well. Any version of the article (present or future) about this comic book will be incomplete without this cover image.

Thank you for your consideration,

Alexa

Send me good vibes!  And maybe send Wikia your own notes of support (via the site or by direct e-mail)?

erikamoen:

This is a strip from my now-completed auto-bio comic DAR! :)

erikamoen:

This is a strip from my now-completed auto-bio comic DAR! :)

There is definitely a way women approach erotica that differs from what you might consider standard output. Smut Peddler has a lot of stories where the centerpiece of the relationship is the emotions being experienced by the people involved; that’s not something you see very often in mainstream porno, which tends to focus on mooshing body parts together. If I were to start dealing in broad generalities, I’d say ladies like context. It’s something women who make porn tend to include, and its absence from porn by male authors and creators can be distracting. Guys (broad generalities again) don’t tend to care WHY the sex is happening. And I wanted some assurance, however imperfect it may ultimately be, that the WHY of the situations would matter, and, as a result, would wind up being sexy to a female audience.
Spike Trotman Talks to ComicsAlliance about “Smut Peddler” 

(via ladiesmakingcomics)

vandtree asked: Hi there, I love this group, i draw a weekly web comic and want to get my sexy on, but im not sure where to start, i have plenty of relationship to know what is sexy, but it just doesnt seem to happen on paper? Any advice?

I’m not much of a creator myself, anyone else want to pass on some advice?

ninapedia:

barometzz:

femmesandfamily:

feministsbakecupcakestoo:

I love pears.

 so cute!!

Pears are scrumptious.

I don’t normally reblog naked things on this blog ‘cause I have to keep it safe for work. But aww~

Not too porny, but adorable :D

ninapedia:

barometzz:

femmesandfamily:

feministsbakecupcakestoo:

I love pears.

 so cute!!

Pears are scrumptious.

I don’t normally reblog naked things on this blog ‘cause I have to keep it safe for work. But aww~

Not too porny, but adorable :D

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